PJ Sosko

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please click to watch and/or hear:

 

PJ's movie and TV reel (4 min.)

 

PJ's drama reel (1 min.)

 

PJ's comedy reel (1 min.)

 

Trailers for PJ's starring role in the 2011 feature film Whaling City

 

Trailer for PJ's starring role in short film Betrayed

 

Music video for the lip-synching Rooftop Boys, starring PJ as lead "singer"

 

December 2010 radio interview with PJ & others about Vietnam veterans play ReEntry

 

Trailers for PJ's starring role in the 2011 feature film Whaling City

 

Trailer for PJ's starring role in short film Betrayed

 

Music video for the lip-synching Rooftop Boys, starring PJ as lead "singer"

 

December 2010 radio interview with PJ & others about Vietnam veterans play ReEntry

 

 

 

The 14-member ensemble is filled with flavorsome and immaculately rendered performances. Perhaps most impressive is PJ Sosko as a barker for and a performer at the freak show. Sosko brings a terrific blend of stubborn machismo and wounded vulnerability to this character.

Backstage on the November 2012 NYC premiere of the play Coney

 

PJ Sosko gives Don a slyly humorous bent that leavens the characterís rough-and-ready combativeness. And Jon Krupp adds a dollop of boyish glee to Michaelís ineffectual whininess. Under the direction of Stephen Nachamie, they give meticulously shaded performances that add depth to Mr. Dresserís lively, sometimes jokey dialogue. The actors give the gags plenty of breathing room, letting them land gently instead of pushing them hard. And when, in the second act, Mr. Dresser cannot resist a few overly dramatic flourishes, the light touch of Mr. Sosko and Mr. Krupp keeps the play on an even keel.

The New York Times on the October 2011 revival of the play Rounding Third

 

A great performance by PJ Sosko as a scruffy veteran of the war in Iraq.

The New York Times on the August 2010 premiere of the one-act play Jonathan’s Blaze

 

We're dazzled by Brother John and by PJ Sosko's riveting performance.

Variety on the February 2010 NYC premiere of the play ReEntry

 

Flat-out fabulous, never striking the false notes that could nudge things toward caricature...Direct, colorful, and even funny as he slips from role to role.

The Washington Post on the November 2010 Baltimore production of the play ReEntry

 

Sosko is outstanding, particularly in portraying John’s difficulty keeping his fury on a leash.

OffOffOnline on the February 2010 NYC premiere of the play ReEntry

 

Hemingway is played by PJ Sosko, a charismatic actor with exceptional energy and focus. Sosko gives his all to bringing the driven author-adventurer to life, and the results are mesmerizing; whenever Sosko's on stage, you can't take your eyes off him.

HyReviews.com on the NYC workshop production of The Jazz Age

 

Mr. Knee may intend the focus of the play to be Fitzgerald's deterioration, as writer's block and alcohol squash his promise.

But PJ Sosko's terrific turn as Hemingway thwarts that; he's simply too magnetic to be subordinate. If that costs the play a clear focus, well, so what.

The New York Times on the February 2008 world premiere of The Jazz Age

 

The play's best asset is not the music but PJ Sosko,

who thunders through the weak script with a kind

of overjoyed rage in his role as Ernest Hemingway.

Variety on the February 2008 world premiere of The Jazz Age

 

When PJ Sosko swaggers onto the stage as McMurphy, it's impossible not to compare him to Jack Nicholson. Within a few minutes, though, he has made the role his own. His McMurphy is less leering, sneering junkyard dog than laughing, dancing bantam rooster.

The Oregonian on the February 2011 revival of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest

 

Mr. Sosko conveys the shifting emotions and building resentment

inside Treat with a compelling intensity.

The New York Times on the July 2007 play Orphans

 

Treat, played by the exceptional PJ Sosko, is a volcanic bundle of nerves in a stocking cap, a ball of rage able to keep his anger in check for just so long before he erupts.

The Journal News on the July 2007 play Orphans

 

PJ Sosko keeps Hank's perpetual-winner's gleam in his eye, even in moments of prideful anger, but also hints at the vulnerabilities in his tough-guy armor, as well as his keen if unschooled intelligence. And he brings an apt physicality that raises the ante of every interaction...Riveting.

—The Oregonian on the April 2008 revival of the play Sometimes a Great Notion

 

PJ Sosko gives depth and sympathy to the humorless,

un-ironic Mormon Joe Pitt; what could have been cartoonish

becomes deeply resonant.

NewTimes on the play Angels in America

 

PJ Sosko is unflaggingly appealing and credible.

nytheatre.com's Martin Denton on the

NYC premiere of The End Of You

 

Sosko's charisma and aggressive charm are troublingly difficult

to resist. His flashes of repentance vanish and reappear

 as quickly as his bravado.

IthacaTimes.com on the play Spike Heels

 

Sosko (has) the perfect amount of charm and mischievousness.

GW Hatchet on the Folger Theatre's

production of Much Ado About Nothing

 

Sosko's comic timing is impeccable, and when he's onstage

it's difficult to watch anyone else.

House Lights on the play Spike Heels

 

These actors can get laughs with the lift of an eyebrow. It's hard to choose a favorite from the six very talented players, but Mr. Sosko does have some astonishing scenes as Eddie, including one of the scariest early-morning hangovers ever portrayed.

The New York Times on the NYC play Only You

 

Mr. Sosko's ingratiating Benedict plays the cocky flyboy to the hilt, the offhand breeziness hiding a gulping fear of commitment...they make a dandy pair, his bantam strutting a comic contrast to her demure unbending from on high.

The Washington Times on the Folger Theatre's

production of Much Ado About Nothing

 

PJ Sosko was simply hysterical. Among the high points of Sosko's hilarity was Act II Scene 3 when Benedick said, "I will hide me in the ... audience" (rather than Shakespeare's "I will hide me in the arbor"). True to his word, he ran straight at the front row, clambered over them, and hopped right into the lap of some woman in the second row. Then he remained "hidden" in various laps for the rest of the scene, delivering his asides to whomever he happened to be straddling at the moment.

Off-Off-Broadway Review (OOBR) on NYC Sonnet Rep's

production of Much Ado About Nothing

 

As Vining, PJ Sosko nebulously hangs between child and adult states. Unflamboyant yet self-possessed, the actor controls the space through the smallest gesture—a flick of the wrist or the stroke of a pen.

CurtainUp on the NYC premiere of the play Automatic Earth

 

Sosko's strengths are his natural timing, emotion,

and intense devotion to a project.

Newswire, in profile of PJ Sosko

 

 

 

 

 

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Email: hy@hyreviews.com